CBA2I

March 12, 2018
Announcement

Advancing Partners & Communities (APC) recently conducted research to show that self-injected contraceptives increase the continued use of contraception among women in low-resource settings, where the availability of high-quality contraceptives is limited. The full results of this research have now been published in The Lancet Global Health.

Policy

This map illustrates the status of the provision of injectable contraception by community health workers by country in sub-Saharan Africa.

Case Study

Private drug shops could offer an opportunity to expand access to family planning because they are commonplace in rural areas and support a sustainable commercial market for health products.

March 24, 2017
Blog

Translating research into policy and practice was key to the acceptance of CBA2I in Africa.

Brief

At the London Family Planning Summit in 2012, the Government of Uganda committed to providing universal access to family planning and reducing unmet need for family planning from the current 40 percent to 10 percent by 2022. To meet this ambitious goal, all potential means of increasing accessibility to family planning must be explored.

Brief

This brief outlines the background, objectives, implementation steps & timeline, overview, and indicators of APC Benin’s community-based access to injectable contraceptives pilot project.

Brief

This brief outlines the background, objectives, implementation steps & timeline, overview, and indicators of APC Benin’s community-based access to injectable contraceptives pilot project. 

Brief

This brief outlines the details of a study requested by the Malawi Ministry of Health and USAID/Malawi to assess home and self-injection of Sayana® Press in Malawi.

Training Guide

This trainer’s guide provides content for training on the progestin-only injectable contraceptive Sayana® Press. These materials were first used in 2012 to train facility- and community-based providers on use of Sayana Press (formerly depo-subQ in Uniject) in acceptability studies in Senegal and Uganda.

Publication

This brief focuses on the use of drug shops to increase access to injectable contraceptives, a strategy that had previously not received sufficient attention in the literature.

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